WHO scientists used Photoshop to doctor images in cancer research

Researchers affiliated with WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have been exposed for manipulating images in multiple research papers they have published over the years.

Between 2005 and 2014, Massimo Tommasino, head of Infections and Cancer Biology Group at IARC in Lyon, France, and his former colleague there Uzma Hasan, had published multiple papers with doctored images.

Manipulated photos in studies can generally be anything from those of microscopic views of cells or tissues, images of glowing gels indicating chemical concentrations, or even graphical representation of data. There can be dire consequences to tweaking an image in a research paper.

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Source: The Next Web

Would a global cyber ethics commission help 'counter the lies' of the tech lobby?

For computer scientist Hany Farid, developing image analysis tools that can stop illegal content online is not enough. He says we all need to take responsibility, not least the companies that lobby and lie hard.

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Source: DW

Source: DW

Fake news, hoax images: How to spot a digitally altered photo from the real deal

A shark swimming down a flooded road. A bunch of missiles blasting off in unison during an Iranian missile test.

At first glance they might seem reasonable, but digitally altered images are everywhere, spreading like wildfire on news sites and social media.

So how can you tell if that photo your uncle shared on Facebook is authentic — or has been manipulated?

Image forensic experts have a few tools to spot images that have been tinkered with.

Algorithms can spot cloned areas, like the extra Iranian missile inserted into a launch photo (although, just looking at it, that one is pretty obvious).

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Source: ABC Au