How an InfoWars Video Became a White House Tweet

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders shared a video Wednesday evening of CNN reporter Jim Acosta’s interaction with President Trump and a White House intern to defend the White House’s decision to revoke Acosta’s press pass. A WIRED review of Sanders’ video reveals that it originated with conservative media sites and was presented in a way that makes the incident seem more dramatic than it was. Images from the video may not have been altered, but the effect is potentially misleading to viewers.

In releasing the video, Sanders said it offered proof of Acosta’s “inappropriate behavior” with the intern. But differences between Sanders’ video and an unedited version of the incident led to charges Wednesday that the White House had altered the video for political purposes.

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Source: Wired

Source: Wired

WHO scientists used Photoshop to doctor images in cancer research

Researchers affiliated with WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have been exposed for manipulating images in multiple research papers they have published over the years.

Between 2005 and 2014, Massimo Tommasino, head of Infections and Cancer Biology Group at IARC in Lyon, France, and his former colleague there Uzma Hasan, had published multiple papers with doctored images.

Manipulated photos in studies can generally be anything from those of microscopic views of cells or tissues, images of glowing gels indicating chemical concentrations, or even graphical representation of data. There can be dire consequences to tweaking an image in a research paper.

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Source: The Next Web

How to Send a Secret Image in Plain Sight

iOS: For reasons ranging from risqué to super-spy, you might occasionally want to send a secret image to somebody. While there are plenty of apps you can use to send disappearing images, Cammeleon is a cool little iOS app that lets you hide images within images.

To keep your secrets hidden, open the app, take a picture, add an optional caption, and hit the right arrow next to the caption box (even if you can’t see it). Then, add a second picture and an optional password, and use the same right arrow to send it wherever it needs to go.

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Source: Lifehacker