WHO scientists used Photoshop to doctor images in cancer research

Researchers affiliated with WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) have been exposed for manipulating images in multiple research papers they have published over the years.

Between 2005 and 2014, Massimo Tommasino, head of Infections and Cancer Biology Group at IARC in Lyon, France, and his former colleague there Uzma Hasan, had published multiple papers with doctored images.

Manipulated photos in studies can generally be anything from those of microscopic views of cells or tissues, images of glowing gels indicating chemical concentrations, or even graphical representation of data. There can be dire consequences to tweaking an image in a research paper.

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Source: The Next Web

How to Send a Secret Image in Plain Sight

iOS: For reasons ranging from risqué to super-spy, you might occasionally want to send a secret image to somebody. While there are plenty of apps you can use to send disappearing images, Cammeleon is a cool little iOS app that lets you hide images within images.

To keep your secrets hidden, open the app, take a picture, add an optional caption, and hit the right arrow next to the caption box (even if you can’t see it). Then, add a second picture and an optional password, and use the same right arrow to send it wherever it needs to go.

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Source: Lifehacker

Fake America great again

Guess what? I just got hold of some embarrassing video footage of Texas senator Ted Cruz singing and gyrating to Tina Turner. His political enemies will have great fun showing it during the midterms. Donald Trump will call him “Dancin’ Ted.”

Okay, I’ll admit it—I created the video myself. But here’s the troubling thing: making it required very little video-editing skill. I downloaded and configured software that uses machine learning to perform a convincing digital face-swap. The resulting video, known as a deepfake, shows Cruz’s distinctively droopy eyes stitched onto the features of actor Paul Rudd doing lip-sync karaoke. It isn’t perfect—there’s something a little off—but it might fool some people.

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 Source: Technology Review

Source: Technology Review